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What Does The Bible Say…with Rick Boyer

What-Does-The-Bible-Say-CMGenesis 1:1:In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.

Most of us know that one. Yet I went twenty years of my life thinking it meant that God worked through evolution to make the world and man to live in it. I was a grown man before I heard a preacher make an issue of the creation vs. evolution question.

I just got back from a trip to the Creation Museum last week. I had heard a lot of Ken Ham’s teaching before, but I learned some new things and my faith was strengthened still more by the museum’s abundance of scientific evidence of young-earth creation.

If you want biblical evidence, you need look no farther than Romans 5:12: “Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned:”

In other words, there was no death before sin. Therefore the dinosaurs didn’t die before Adam sinned. The fossils are only a few thousand years old. The lie of evolution is just Satan’s trick to undermine our confidence in the Word of God.

What about theistic evolution? I guess that’s what I believed in as a kid. The Bible said that God created the earth in 6 days and then rested. School said that natural forces created the universe out of nothing, living matter out of nonliving matter and more complex species out of less complex species. I reconciled the contradiction by concluding that God must have used the evolutionary process and the “days” of Genesis were in fact long ages, referred to symbolically.

But of course that doesn’t account for the fact that there could be no death before sin. So, to deny Genesis 1 we also have to deny Romans 5. If we don’t trust God’s account of the beginning, we can’t trust His Word on anything else. Pity us if we doubt any of God’s truth.

 

 

Lawyer for the Defense – Saturday Stories

Saturday-Stories-Boston-MassacreNo doubt you’ve heard of the Boston Massacre. By the title given to the event, you might imagine a huge bloodbath with hundreds of bodies littering the streets. Actually, five colonists were killed.

The confrontation came about because a gang of colonists were harassing a small group of British soldiers on guard duty. The Redcoats were hated in Boston as in many parts of the colonies because they represented the tyrannical grip that King George held on them. Some British soldiers had committed serious offenses, so the red uniform was looked upon with malice. Read More…

The First Prayer in Congress ~ Saturday Stories

Saturday-Stories-PrayerWe often hear about “separation of church and state.” This ­­­­­­term has been twisted to mean just about the opposite of what Jefferson meant when he used it in a letter to the Danbury Baptists. By the way, it’s not in the Constitution.

Such a concept would have been very strange indeed to the Founding Fathers. Their devotion to the Christian faith is the reason that most federal buildings in Washington DC have Scripture passages etched into their stone walls.

America started out as a Christian nation and her Founders intended that it should remain so. The very first Continental Congress, opening on September 7, 1774 set a most interesting and encouraging precedent.

The delegates had just received the news that Boston Harbor had been closed by the British navy, bringing to a sudden stop its bustling trade. Further, Britain was rushing more and more soldiers to keep a lid on the increasing American resentment of King George’s rude treatment of the American colonies. These were not the actions of a benevolent king.

So it was that representatives from 12 of the 13 colonies met in Carpenter’s Hall in Philadelphia on September 6 to form a Congress and to discuss what measures to take in the face of such grave threats of tyranny. Someone suggested that the meeting must be opened with prayer. Others said such a move was inappropriate because several denominations of Christians were represented, and none must feel slighted if the minister chosen to pray was of another sect.

Then Sam Adams stood. “I am no bigot,” he pronounced. “I can hear a prayer from any man who is also a patriot.” He suggested the Reverend Jacob Duche, of whom he had heard a good report. Reverend Duche was summoned.

Next morning, the minister faced the assembled delegates and read from Psalm 35: “Contend O LORD with those who contend with me; fight against those who fight against me.” He finished the Psalm and then launched into extemporaneous prayer. His words were so eloquent that some members remarked that it would have been worth a hundred-mile ride to hear him. When he finished the entire company, many on their knees, joined in prayer. The whole exercise continued for over 3 hours.

That spirit of dependence on God continued throughout the War of Independence and the founding of America as a free nation. Only in recent years has there been any serious question that America was intended to be born and continue as a Christian nation. To this day, Congress opens each session with prayer.

 

What Does The Bible Say…with Rick Boyer

What-Does-the-Bible-Say-Rick-Boyer2Proverbs 25:24: “It is better to live in a corner of the roof than in a house shared with a contentious woman.”

There is always a temptation to take someone for granted, no matter how much you love him or her, when you see each other day in and day out. In fact, it’s easy to slip into carelessness in the relationship. This verse is a timely reminder to both sexes.

Husband, if you have a good wife be thankful. All of us know men who are married to women who make their lives miserable. That doesn’t mean that the husband is any better than the wife, just that when there are conflicts that cause the wife to be contentious life is miserable for the husband as well. If you have a cheerful, godly wife give thanks to God and to her as well.

Wife, there will be moments in any marriage when you are tempted to be contentious. Your husband is a sinner and he will fail you at times. When you’re tempted to react, try to remember this verse. Maybe the thought of just how serious this relationship is, will help you to count to ten before speaking.

 

 

Walking Into a Mine Field ~ Saturday Stories

Saturday-Stories-DelioThe little group of American soldiers had been successful. The bridge Rommel used to conduct operations in North Africa had been blown sky high, along with nearby buildings and a considerable amount of stored war material. But now the Germans all around were swarming like bees and the Americans had ninety miles to go to return to their launching point behind friendly lines.

They split up into small groups to make their escape. Their leader, Lieutenant Dan DeLeo took five men and started out toward the American lines. They hid out by day and traveled by night. Talking over possibilities, they decided to commandeer a vehicle on a nearby road and try to drive as far as possible toward safety.

Holding a pistol behind his back, DeLeo flagged down a covered truck. When the driver stopped to ask what was the matter, the soldier stuck a pistol in his face and took charge. The rest of the Americans piled into the back of the truck while DeLeo sat beside the driver and assured him that he was a dead man if he gave away his passengers’ presence. He found a white cloth on the seat which he wrapped around his head in the manner of the neighboring Arabs.

The ride was a harrowing one. More than once the GI’s rolled right through groups of hostile German or Italian soldiers. Finally, the old truck broke down on a muddy road, still fifty miles from friendly forces. There was nothing to do but walk.

Three weeks after destroying the bridge, the exhausted commandos reached a friendly French encampment. As they gratefully approached the sentries, the noticed that the Frenchmen were yelling at them frantically in French. Seeing no sign of an enemy soldier, the GI’s were mystified at what had so upset the Frenchmen. They were soon to find out.

Upon reaching the French defenses, they found an officer who spoke some English. After talking to his sentries, he informed the Americans that they had just walked through a minefield!

 

 

To Battle in Bedroom Slippers – Saturday Stories

Saturday-Stories-DarbyLieutenant Stanley Farwell was a gung-ho, freewheeling, macho member of Darby’s Rangers, an American unit which had its baptism of fire during the World War II North Africa Campaign.  In that he was no exception.  The unit was full of cowboy types. Farwell was, however an exception in shoe size.  When his size fourteen-and-a-half combat boots finally wore out, he discovered that the U. S. Army was ill-prepared for soldiers apparently related to Bigfoot. There were no replacements readily available.  What to do?

The resourceful young Stanley explored some abandoned houses.  In one he found some shoes, not quite his size but usable.  One problem: they were bedroom slippers. Not one to be put off by minor irritations, Stanley marched and fought in his fluffy footwear for some time before new boots could be procured for him.  During that time, Farwell’s jeep suffered a ruptured tire.  No spare was available!  Oh well, he’d have to improvise again.  

Under cover of night, Stanley went tire shopping.  In his bedroom slippers, he shuffled across a considerable portion of North Africa in the dark and found his way behind German lines.  Finally locating a German vehicle whose tires would fit his jeep, Stanley worked quickly and quietly to remove a wheel.  Undiscovered, he completed his task and stealthily shuffled–and rolled–his way back to American territory.

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