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Make A Resurrection Garden

Resurrection GardenA dear friend of mine shared this with me. She plants a resurrection garden each year as a visual reminder that:

“Living, He loved me/Dying, He saved me/Buried, He carried my sins far away/Rising, He justified freely forever/One day He’s coming, O glorious day!”

What a great tradition! She uses wheat grass which grows quickly. The “tomb” is a clay flower pot turned on it’s side. Plant your wheat grass in mounded up dirt or potting soil. Spread rocks around the entrance to the”tomb”. Use a large rock for the stone that was rolled away on Resurrection Day. Place three crosses made from sticks at the back of the display.
I want to do this and use it as the centerpiece for the Easter season.
Thanks for sharing, Debbie!

True Love Cupcakes

cupcakeIn this world, the word “love” is twisted and misused. This Valentines Day project helps teach your children what “true love” is. Read More…

Recipe Box: Toll House Pie

Toll House PieThis “chocolate chip cookie” pie is a Thanksgiving tradition for us. Enjoy!

  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 c. flour
  • 1/2 c. sugar
  • 1/2 c. light brown sugar
  • 3/4 c. softened butter or margarine
  • 1 c. chopped walnuts or pecans (optional)
  • 1 (6 oz.) pkg. semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 1 prepared 8 or 9-inch pie shell

Beat eggs at a high speed until foamy, about 3 minutes. Beat in flour, sugars, then margarine. Stir in nuts and chocolate chips. Pour into pie shell. Bake at 325  for 55 to 60 minutes. Serve hot with ice cream or whipped cream, if desired.



Saturday Stories ~ The Exploding Ship

Saturday-Stories-SDBoys of Liberty Collection 3- The War of 1812 Series

Stephen Decatur is said to have been the first national military hero after the War of Independence. Starting as a lowly midshipman in his late teens, he was promoted to the high rank of Commodore while still a young man.

Of the many adventures that advanced his career was an especially dangerous one that took him and his comrades right under the noses of enemy guns. It was in the midst of our conflict with the Barbary Pirates, a very early episode in our Read More…

Lever House Macaroons

Lever house macaroonsHere’s a festive cookie recipe that kids will love to decorate!

  • 1 c. shortening
  • 3/4 c. firmly packed brown sugar
  • 3/4 c. granulated sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla
  • 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 
  • 2 unbeaten eggs
  • 1/2 chopped walnuts (optional)
  • 1  1/4 c. flour
  • 1 tsp. soda
  • 3 c. rolled oats
  • Candy corn (optional)


Combine shortening, sugars, vanilla, salt, cinnamon, and eggs. Beat thoroughly. Stir in walnuts. Sift together flour and soda. Add to shortening mixture and blend. Stir in oats. Place dough by tablespoonfuls on greased cookie sheets, leaving a little space between them. Press with a fork.  Press candy corn into the cookies (we sometimes do it in the shape of a smiley face). Bake in 350 oven for 12-14 minutes. Cool about 2 minutes before removing them from the sheet.

YIELD 5 1/2 dozen



For lollipop cookies, prepare dough as directed above. Just before baking, insert a lollipop stick, paper drinking straw, or wooden skewer into each mound of dough with sticks parallel to the cookie sheet to make it look like a lollipop. Decorate with facial features using candy corn, m&m’s, gumdrops, raisins etc. Bake as directed                                                                                                                



Saturday Stories ~ A “Wasted” Ride

Saturday-Stories-WentworthWentworth Cheswell was a Patriot of mixed race. Although his appearance reflected that of his slave father, his mother was a free white woman. He grew up in New Hampshire prior to the War of Independence and is considered the first black American to hold public office.

Cheswell served his community and state in a number of ways and was well thought of in both church and community. One of his more exciting experiences was a midnight ride he took on the same night of Paul Revere’s famous trek, April 18, 1775.

Young Cheswell was a designated messenger for the local Committee of Correspondence in Exeter, New Hampshire. On the day of his adventure, word had come that the British intended to come around by sea and attack nearby Portsmouth. The town must be warned. Cheswell mounted his horse and took off.

It was a ride of several miles and several hours. Riding a galloping horse is dangerous in the dark and there was the added risk of running into a British patrol. But around dawn of the 19th, as the colonists faced the British at Lexington, Massachusetts the young messenger slid, exhausted from his horse in Portsmouth. Immediately the town was awake and frantically looking to her seaward defenses.

But the attack never came. In one of the dramatic twists of history, the British had settled on a plan to attack the colonists to the west rather than to the north of their headquarters in Boston.

Wentworth Cheswell was just one of several riders that night. As Paul Revere and William Dawes rode west from Boston to warn Lexington and Concord, others picked up the urgent message and galloped off in all directions. Responding to their message, hundreds of patriot minutemen picked up their muskets and hastened to Lexington to make it hot for the British as they retreated to Boston.

Paul Revere was the one made famous by a Longfellow poem (“Billy Dawes got on his hoss…” doesn’t have quite the right ring, I guess), but let us not forget the other heroes of that fateful night and following day. Some rode, some fought. One of them, Wentworth Cheswell went on to serve honorably in the war and then establish himself and his family as pillars of an early American community. You can read more about him and others in Profiles of Valor.