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Raising Boys

Raising BoysI grew up in a family of girls, never having much close exposure to boys. When Rick and I started our family, sure enough we had the first boy grandchild for both sets of our parents. I remember thinking- Wow, what do I do with a boy? As a matter of fact, we had 4 little boys in a row, all 18 months apart form each other! When our oldest son was just 3 months old, we began attending a Sunday school class in which the teacher talked about internalizing Scripture. This was something so new to me, being a new Christian myself.
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Saturday Stories ~ The Exploding Ship

Saturday-Stories-SDBoys of Liberty Collection 3- The War of 1812 Series

Stephen Decatur is said to have been the first national military hero after the War of Independence. Starting as a lowly midshipman in his late teens, he was promoted to the high rank of Commodore while still a young man.

Of the many adventures that advanced his career was an especially dangerous one that took him and his comrades right under the noses of enemy guns. It was in the midst of our conflict with the Barbary Pirates, a very early episode in our Read More…

Saturday Stories ~ A “Wasted” Ride

Saturday-Stories-WentworthWentworth Cheswell was a Patriot of mixed race. Although his appearance reflected that of his slave father, his mother was a free white woman. He grew up in New Hampshire prior to the War of Independence and is considered the first black American to hold public office.

Cheswell served his community and state in a number of ways and was well thought of in both church and community. One of his more exciting experiences was a midnight ride he took on the same night of Paul Revere’s famous trek, April 18, 1775.

Young Cheswell was a designated messenger for the local Committee of Correspondence in Exeter, New Hampshire. On the day of his adventure, word had come that the British intended to come around by sea and attack nearby Portsmouth. The town must be warned. Cheswell mounted his horse and took off.

It was a ride of several miles and several hours. Riding a galloping horse is dangerous in the dark and there was the added risk of running into a British patrol. But around dawn of the 19th, as the colonists faced the British at Lexington, Massachusetts the young messenger slid, exhausted from his horse in Portsmouth. Immediately the town was awake and frantically looking to her seaward defenses.

But the attack never came. In one of the dramatic twists of history, the British had settled on a plan to attack the colonists to the west rather than to the north of their headquarters in Boston.

Wentworth Cheswell was just one of several riders that night. As Paul Revere and William Dawes rode west from Boston to warn Lexington and Concord, others picked up the urgent message and galloped off in all directions. Responding to their message, hundreds of patriot minutemen picked up their muskets and hastened to Lexington to make it hot for the British as they retreated to Boston.

Paul Revere was the one made famous by a Longfellow poem (“Billy Dawes got on his hoss…” doesn’t have quite the right ring, I guess), but let us not forget the other heroes of that fateful night and following day. Some rode, some fought. One of them, Wentworth Cheswell went on to serve honorably in the war and then establish himself and his family as pillars of an early American community. You can read more about him and others in Profiles of Valor.

www.ProfilesOfValor.com

Homeschooling In Our House

 

school workPeople have often asked me just what “school” has looked like in our house. Homeschooling is all about your relationship with your kids. Think about it as you plan the  school year. Plan to be with your kids as they learn. I never tell my kids to go do their school. I try to get a load of laundry in while they are getting their chores done and then we do schoolwork together. BE IN THE CLASSROOM! One day I went into the living room because I was tired and one-by-one all the kids drifted in to join me—they are so much more motivated if mom is involved! Read More…

To Battle in Bedroom Slippers – Saturday Stories

Saturday-Stories-DarbyLieutenant Stanley Farwell was a gung-ho, freewheeling, macho member of Darby’s Rangers, an American unit which had its baptism of fire during the World War II North Africa Campaign.  In that he was no exception.  The unit was full of cowboy types. Farwell was, however an exception in shoe size.  When his size fourteen-and-a-half combat boots finally wore out, he discovered that the U. S. Army was ill-prepared for soldiers apparently related to Bigfoot. There were no replacements readily available.  What to do?

The resourceful young Stanley explored some abandoned houses.  In one he found some shoes, not quite his size but usable.  One problem: they were bedroom slippers. Not one to be put off by minor irritations, Stanley marched and fought in his fluffy footwear for some time before new boots could be procured for him.  During that time, Farwell’s jeep suffered a ruptured tire.  No spare was available!  Oh well, he’d have to improvise again.  

Under cover of night, Stanley went tire shopping.  In his bedroom slippers, he shuffled across a considerable portion of North Africa in the dark and found his way behind German lines.  Finally locating a German vehicle whose tires would fit his jeep, Stanley worked quickly and quietly to remove a wheel.  Undiscovered, he completed his task and stealthily shuffled–and rolled–his way back to American territory.

#CharacterConcepts #SaturdayStories #UncleRick

 

 

Don’t be afraid to think outside of the box ~ Mondays with Marilyn

Mondays-w-Marilyn-Outside-the-BoxIf you find something in your curriculum that strikes the interest of one of your kids, expand upon it.

Get a whole biography of some person mentioned in their history book, visit a veteran and learn history from those who lived it.

Cook “Math” one day instead of just doing the problems in a book. Learn the skeletal system by tracing your child and having them glue bones down to their outline, build a volcano in the sandbox with vinegar and baking soda.

Let your child start a business while they are still young to help learn financial skills.

Look for what motivates them and let it become part of your “school”.