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What To Do With Boys~Part 1

BDaniel Booneoys and Heroes

It’s trendy today to refer to “role models” for boys. Why might that be? Why doesn’t anybody suggest that boys should have “heroes” anymore? Read More…

Taking Matters Into Her Own Hands ~ What Does The Bible Say…

Sunday---What-Does-The-Bible-Say-RebekahGenesis 27:21-23

“Then Rebekah took the best garments of Esau her elder son, which were with her in the house, and put them on Jacob her younger son. And she put the skins of the young goats on his hands and on the smooth part of his neck. She also gave the savory food and the bread, which she had made, to her son Jacob.”

What’s going on here?

The connivings of a mother to help her favorite son steal his brother’s paternal blessing. Jacob had already conned Esau out of his birthright. Now he wants the blessing of the firstborn too. But from the text, it appears that this theft was his mother’s idea, not his own. She is going behind her husband’s back to help one child rob another. Sibling rivalry on steroids.

What a despicable idea!

Of course we don’t know what other factors might have entered into the situation. We aren’t told whether Esau had been a rebel from youth, repeatedly breaking his mother’s heart. It’s possible that Jacob had been very good to his mother and that Rebekah knew villainous things about Esau that Isaac never recognized.

Be all that as it may, Rebekah is taking matters into her own hands that had been entrusted by God to her husband.

It may have seemed like a wise and even necessary act at the time. But read next week’s Sunday Scripture to see how it worked out.

Saturday Stories ~ A “Wasted” Ride

Saturday-Stories-WentworthWentworth Cheswell was a Patriot of mixed race. Although his appearance reflected that of his slave father, his mother was a free white woman. He grew up in New Hampshire prior to the War of Independence and is considered the first black American to hold public office.

Cheswell served his community and state in a number of ways and was well thought of in both church and community. One of his more exciting experiences was a midnight ride he took on the same night of Paul Revere’s famous trek, April 18, 1775.

Young Cheswell was a designated messenger for the local Committee of Correspondence in Exeter, New Hampshire. On the day of his adventure, word had come that the British intended to come around by sea and attack nearby Portsmouth. The town must be warned. Cheswell mounted his horse and took off.

It was a ride of several miles and several hours. Riding a galloping horse is dangerous in the dark and there was the added risk of running into a British patrol. But around dawn of the 19th, as the colonists faced the British at Lexington, Massachusetts the young messenger slid, exhausted from his horse in Portsmouth. Immediately the town was awake and frantically looking to her seaward defenses.

But the attack never came. In one of the dramatic twists of history, the British had settled on a plan to attack the colonists to the west rather than to the north of their headquarters in Boston.

Wentworth Cheswell was just one of several riders that night. As Paul Revere and William Dawes rode west from Boston to warn Lexington and Concord, others picked up the urgent message and galloped off in all directions. Responding to their message, hundreds of patriot minutemen picked up their muskets and hastened to Lexington to make it hot for the British as they retreated to Boston.

Paul Revere was the one made famous by a Longfellow poem (“Billy Dawes got on his hoss…” doesn’t have quite the right ring, I guess), but let us not forget the other heroes of that fateful night and following day. Some rode, some fought. One of them, Wentworth Cheswell went on to serve honorably in the war and then establish himself and his family as pillars of an early American community. You can read more about him and others in Profiles of Valor.

www.ProfilesOfValor.com

What Does The Bible Say…with Rick Boyer

What-Does-The-Bible-Say-CMGenesis 1:1:In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.

Most of us know that one. Yet I went twenty years of my life thinking it meant that God worked through evolution to make the world and man to live in it. I was a grown man before I heard a preacher make an issue of the creation vs. evolution question.

I just got back from a trip to the Creation Museum last week. I had heard a lot of Ken Ham’s teaching before, but I learned some new things and my faith was strengthened still more by the museum’s abundance of scientific evidence of young-earth creation.

If you want biblical evidence, you need look no farther than Romans 5:12: “Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned:”

In other words, there was no death before sin. Therefore the dinosaurs didn’t die before Adam sinned. The fossils are only a few thousand years old. The lie of evolution is just Satan’s trick to undermine our confidence in the Word of God.

What about theistic evolution? I guess that’s what I believed in as a kid. The Bible said that God created the earth in 6 days and then rested. School said that natural forces created the universe out of nothing, living matter out of nonliving matter and more complex species out of less complex species. I reconciled the contradiction by concluding that God must have used the evolutionary process and the “days” of Genesis were in fact long ages, referred to symbolically.

But of course that doesn’t account for the fact that there could be no death before sin. So, to deny Genesis 1 we also have to deny Romans 5. If we don’t trust God’s account of the beginning, we can’t trust His Word on anything else. Pity us if we doubt any of God’s truth.

 

 

What Does The Bible Say…with Rick Boyer

What-Does-the-Bible-Say-Rick-Boyer2Proverbs 25:24: “It is better to live in a corner of the roof than in a house shared with a contentious woman.”

There is always a temptation to take someone for granted, no matter how much you love him or her, when you see each other day in and day out. In fact, it’s easy to slip into carelessness in the relationship. This verse is a timely reminder to both sexes.

Husband, if you have a good wife be thankful. All of us know men who are married to women who make their lives miserable. That doesn’t mean that the husband is any better than the wife, just that when there are conflicts that cause the wife to be contentious life is miserable for the husband as well. If you have a cheerful, godly wife give thanks to God and to her as well.

Wife, there will be moments in any marriage when you are tempted to be contentious. Your husband is a sinner and he will fail you at times. When you’re tempted to react, try to remember this verse. Maybe the thought of just how serious this relationship is, will help you to count to ten before speaking.

 

 

Walking Into a Mine Field ~ Saturday Stories

Saturday-Stories-DelioThe little group of American soldiers had been successful. The bridge Rommel used to conduct operations in North Africa had been blown sky high, along with nearby buildings and a considerable amount of stored war material. But now the Germans all around were swarming like bees and the Americans had ninety miles to go to return to their launching point behind friendly lines.

They split up into small groups to make their escape. Their leader, Lieutenant Dan DeLeo took five men and started out toward the American lines. They hid out by day and traveled by night. Talking over possibilities, they decided to commandeer a vehicle on a nearby road and try to drive as far as possible toward safety.

Holding a pistol behind his back, DeLeo flagged down a covered truck. When the driver stopped to ask what was the matter, the soldier stuck a pistol in his face and took charge. The rest of the Americans piled into the back of the truck while DeLeo sat beside the driver and assured him that he was a dead man if he gave away his passengers’ presence. He found a white cloth on the seat which he wrapped around his head in the manner of the neighboring Arabs.

The ride was a harrowing one. More than once the GI’s rolled right through groups of hostile German or Italian soldiers. Finally, the old truck broke down on a muddy road, still fifty miles from friendly forces. There was nothing to do but walk.

Three weeks after destroying the bridge, the exhausted commandos reached a friendly French encampment. As they gratefully approached the sentries, the noticed that the Frenchmen were yelling at them frantically in French. Seeing no sign of an enemy soldier, the GI’s were mystified at what had so upset the Frenchmen. They were soon to find out.

Upon reaching the French defenses, they found an officer who spoke some English. After talking to his sentries, he informed the Americans that they had just walked through a minefield!