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To Battle in Bedroom Slippers – Saturday Stories

Saturday-Stories-DarbyLieutenant Stanley Farwell was a gung-ho, freewheeling, macho member of Darby’s Rangers, an American unit which had its baptism of fire during the World War II North Africa Campaign.  In that he was no exception.  The unit was full of cowboy types. Farwell was, however an exception in shoe size.  When his size fourteen-and-a-half combat boots finally wore out, he discovered that the U. S. Army was ill-prepared for soldiers apparently related to Bigfoot. There were no replacements readily available.  What to do?

The resourceful young Stanley explored some abandoned houses.  In one he found some shoes, not quite his size but usable.  One problem: they were bedroom slippers. Not one to be put off by minor irritations, Stanley marched and fought in his fluffy footwear for some time before new boots could be procured for him.  During that time, Farwell’s jeep suffered a ruptured tire.  No spare was available!  Oh well, he’d have to improvise again.  

Under cover of night, Stanley went tire shopping.  In his bedroom slippers, he shuffled across a considerable portion of North Africa in the dark and found his way behind German lines.  Finally locating a German vehicle whose tires would fit his jeep, Stanley worked quickly and quietly to remove a wheel.  Undiscovered, he completed his task and stealthily shuffled–and rolled–his way back to American territory.

#CharacterConcepts #SaturdayStories #UncleRick

 

 

He Was No Side Show ~ Saturday Stories

Saturday-Stories-BullSitting Bull was a famous fighting Indian chief, a great leader of the Sioux nation.

But after many years of warring against the American government, Sitting Bull was finally compelled to yield to superior numbers and surrender. A few years after his people gave up the warpath, he was befriended by Buffalo Bill Cody. Cody had been an army scout and had done his share of fighting against the Indians. But he held no malice toward the red man, and wanted to see him treated with fairness by the government and his rights respected.

A born showman, Cody put together Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, a sort of circus that included mock battles between real Indians and Bluecoat soldiers, stage coach robberies, buffalo hunts and gunfights. Wish I could have been there.

Buffalo Bill prevailed upon the old chief Sitting Bull to be a part of this show, rightly figuring that the famous chief would be a huge attraction for the crowd of Eastern show-goers who delighted in seeing a real live piece of the Wild West. Bill and Bull often traveled together from city to city between shows.

Whenever the train pulled into another town to take on passengers, fuel or water, Cody and the chief would step out onto the platform, address the crowd and shake hands in an attempt to generate interest in their show. Sitting Bull was indeed a huge attraction. People nearly trampled each other to crowd close for a look at the famous fighter. They shouted out offers of large amounts of money for a lock of his hair.

The Chief had experienced enough threats to his scalp to have grown very attached to it, so he politely declined such offers. However, he graciously offered a button off his coat for $5.00. This was a considerable amount of money in those days, but there was no shortage of takers. The Chief sold every button at one stop. As the train pulled away, people who had been disappointed in not having obtained one of the prized souvenirs would gang around the successful buyers and offer them far more than the $5 they had spent for a button. But some miles down the line, another town and another crowd was waiting. These people would want souvenirs too, and they wouldn’t be disappointed.

Because old Chief Sitting Bull was still just as cagey as he had ever been on the warpath.

As the train pulled out of town, he reached into his pocket for several more buttons and began to patiently sew them on his coat for the next crowd.

 

 

Absolutely Pleasing In Every Way! ~ What Does The Bible Say…

Sunday---What-Does-The-Bible-Say-BaptismMatthew 3:17: “and behold, a voice out of the heavens saying, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well-pleased.”

Of course the scene here is the baptism of the Lord Jesus. The Holy Spirit has just descended upon Him as a dove and it seems the perfect time for the Father to announce to the world that Jesus is indeed His only begotten son. And that He is pleased with His son.

It was a wonderful and never-to-be repeated occasion. The Son of God has been announced to the world. This is who He is. And the heavenly Father finds Him absolutely pleasing to Him in every way.

It would be well for all of us parents to make such public statements of pleasure about our children. We can be so quick to criticize and condemn—even in public, if we’re not careful.

How many times have our children heard us praise them publicly?

Do they know that we are happy to proclaim to the world: “Hey world! This is my child! He’s a good one! I’m so glad he’s mine!”

What could make them happier?

 

His Signature Cost Him Everything – Saturday Stories

Saturday-Stories-HartJohn Hart of New Jersey was one of the most persecuted of the Signers by the British. Hart had gained his early education at home and apparently took it much farther by his own efforts, judging by the later offices he held.   But for the most part, he was a farmer and content to be one.

He and his wife had thirteen children, a large and happy family. Then Hart was selected Read More…

Hey Little Buddies, Take Time To Say Thank You!

Its-Unlce-RickJust last week my wife, my daughter Kasey and I returned from a trip to Texas. We were there speaking and telling stories at a home schooling conference. On the way home, we stopped in New Orleans to visit the National World War II museum. It was breathtaking!

World War II ended just a few years before I was born. When I was your age, there were lots and lots of Read More…

Eating Through A Keyhole – SATURDAY STORIES

Saturday-Stories-Abraham-ClarkIt’s a little known fact that the War of Independence was one of the most atrocity-free wars in history.  That is, on the part of the Americans.

The British on the other hand, commonly looted or burned homes, assaulted defenseless women, stole or killed livestock belonging to civilians and treated clergymen with contempt because of their role in fomenting the revolution.  

One preacher in Trenton, New Jersey was stabbed with a bayonet.  A dead American soldier was hacked to pieces by British cavalrymen.  But one of the greatest atrocities committed by the British and their Hessian allies was their treatment of American prisoners. Read More…