5 Reasons Why Your Child Wants to Learn History from Uncle Rick!

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The Uncle Rick Audio Book Club is your child’s home for inspiring American history. (you’ll also find Scripture audios and adventure stories, too!)
 You will hear stories that dig deeper than your history textbook- and that are far more interesting!
These stories will stick with you, and your knowledge of American History will become much more solid.
The best part is that while you are learning more and absorbing all sorts of historical facts and figures, you are actually enjoying doing so. Since these are audio stories, you can easily learn your American History while cleaning your room, riding in the car, or doing chores, or whatever!
But don’t take our word for it!
Here is what our listeners have told us about why they love learning history from Uncle Rick:

Continue reading 5 Reasons Why Your Child Wants to Learn History from Uncle Rick!

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2 Paragraphs You Should Memorize

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preambles

Here are 2 paragraphs every American should know by heart- The preamble to our Constitution, and the preamble to the Declaration of Independence!

Have your children (or whole family) memorize them and discuss their meanings together.

I like to laminate these for added durability. Then I can use them for multiple children throughout the years.

Continue reading 2 Paragraphs You Should Memorize

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What’s He Doing There? ~ Saturday Stories

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Saturday-Stories-Stained-GLassThe old stained glass window has graced Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in Roanoke, Virginia since 1906. The first pastor, Rev. Lylburn Liggins had insisted that it be put there. There had been some opposition to a window honoring a white man in a black church, but the preacher held firm.

Rev. Liggins was a remarkable man. Born a slave, he had pulled himself up by his bootstraps and studied at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania to prepare for the ministry. He had been a bright student, earning some tuition money by Continue reading What’s He Doing There? ~ Saturday Stories

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The Runaway Governor ~ Saturday Stories

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Saturday-Stories-JeffersonThere is no doubt that he is an all-time American hero. An early President, the first Governor of his home state, contributing author of some of our founding documents. Yet some people in his time, like some historians today, considered that one event a blot on his character.

He was a patriot, all right. And well did the British General Cornwallis know it. In fact, he Continue reading The Runaway Governor ~ Saturday Stories

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Lawyer for the Defense – Saturday Stories

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Saturday-Stories-Boston-MassacreNo doubt you’ve heard of the Boston Massacre. By the title given to the event, you might imagine a huge bloodbath with hundreds of bodies littering the streets. Actually, five colonists were killed.

The confrontation came about because a gang of colonists were harassing a small group of British soldiers on guard duty. The Redcoats were hated in Boston as in many parts of the colonies because they represented the tyrannical grip that King George held on them. Some British soldiers had committed serious offenses, so the red uniform was looked upon with malice. Continue reading Lawyer for the Defense – Saturday Stories

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The First Prayer in Congress ~ Saturday Stories

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Saturday-Stories-PrayerWe often hear about “separation of church and state.” This ­­­­­­term has been twisted to mean just about the opposite of what Jefferson meant when he used it in a letter to the Danbury Baptists. By the way, it’s not in the Constitution.

Such a concept would have been very strange indeed to the Founding Fathers. Their devotion to the Christian faith is the reason that most federal buildings in Washington DC have Scripture passages etched into their stone walls.

America started out as a Christian nation and her Founders intended that it should remain so. The very first Continental Congress, opening on September 7, 1774 set a most interesting and encouraging precedent.

The delegates had just received the news that Boston Harbor had been closed by the British navy, bringing to a sudden stop its bustling trade. Further, Britain was rushing more and more soldiers to keep a lid on the increasing American resentment of King George’s rude treatment of the American colonies. These were not the actions of a benevolent king.

So it was that representatives from 12 of the 13 colonies met in Carpenter’s Hall in Philadelphia on September 6 to form a Congress and to discuss what measures to take in the face of such grave threats of tyranny. Someone suggested that the meeting must be opened with prayer. Others said such a move was inappropriate because several denominations of Christians were represented, and none must feel slighted if the minister chosen to pray was of another sect.

Then Sam Adams stood. “I am no bigot,” he pronounced. “I can hear a prayer from any man who is also a patriot.” He suggested the Reverend Jacob Duche, of whom he had heard a good report. Reverend Duche was summoned.

Next morning, the minister faced the assembled delegates and read from Psalm 35: “Contend O LORD with those who contend with me; fight against those who fight against me.” He finished the Psalm and then launched into extemporaneous prayer. His words were so eloquent that some members remarked that it would have been worth a hundred-mile ride to hear him. When he finished the entire company, many on their knees, joined in prayer. The whole exercise continued for over 3 hours.

That spirit of dependence on God continued throughout the War of Independence and the founding of America as a free nation. Only in recent years has there been any serious question that America was intended to be born and continue as a Christian nation. To this day, Congress opens each session with prayer.

 

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