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Uncle Rick Audio Book Club

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The Uncle Rick Audio Club delivers:

● KID-SAFE literature with Uncle Rick’s “Character Comments” throughout

● Learn the exciting truth about our nation’s Providential history how America was founded by God-fearing people and why we have such a wonderful heritage of freedom and justice

● Re-live the great adventures of pilgrims, patriots, soldiers, pony express riders, mountain men,  pioneers and statesmen

● Listen to Scripture and learn to APPLY it in your life

● Download an official membership certificate for each of your children

Saturday Stories ~ Turn and Fire!

Saturday-Stories-Andrew-Jackson-and-Charles-DicksonIt was early morning on May 30, 1806. Two men, coincidentally both lawyers, had ridden two days for this occasion. One would someday be a President of the United States. One would soon be dead.

Andrew Jackson and Charles Dickson had come to blows in the time-honored but foolish custom of dueling. Jackson had had a disagreement with Dickson’s father-in-law about a horse race. Dickson had taken offense and had said something about the character of Jackson’s wife. Others had chimed in on both sides and the disagreement escalated. Dickson published insults to Jackson in the newspaper. Jackson responded in kind and finally wrote to Dickson personally, requesting “satisfaction.” Read More…

Saturday Stories ~ The Exploding Ship

Saturday-Stories-SDBoys of Liberty Collection 3- The War of 1812 Series

Stephen Decatur is said to have been the first national military hero after the War of Independence. Starting as a lowly midshipman in his late teens, he was promoted to the high rank of Commodore while still a young man.

Of the many adventures that advanced his career was an especially dangerous one that took him and his comrades right under the noses of enemy guns. It was in the midst of our conflict with the Barbary Pirates, a very early episode in our Read More…

Saturday Stories ~ A “Wasted” Ride

Saturday-Stories-WentworthWentworth Cheswell was a Patriot of mixed race. Although his appearance reflected that of his slave father, his mother was a free white woman. He grew up in New Hampshire prior to the War of Independence and is considered the first black American to hold public office.

Cheswell served his community and state in a number of ways and was well thought of in both church and community. One of his more exciting experiences was a midnight ride he took on the same night of Paul Revere’s famous trek, April 18, 1775.

Young Cheswell was a designated messenger for the local Committee of Correspondence in Exeter, New Hampshire. On the day of his adventure, word had come that the British intended to come around by sea and attack nearby Portsmouth. The town must be warned. Cheswell mounted his horse and took off.

It was a ride of several miles and several hours. Riding a galloping horse is dangerous in the dark and there was the added risk of running into a British patrol. But around dawn of the 19th, as the colonists faced the British at Lexington, Massachusetts the young messenger slid, exhausted from his horse in Portsmouth. Immediately the town was awake and frantically looking to her seaward defenses.

But the attack never came. In one of the dramatic twists of history, the British had settled on a plan to attack the colonists to the west rather than to the north of their headquarters in Boston.

Wentworth Cheswell was just one of several riders that night. As Paul Revere and William Dawes rode west from Boston to warn Lexington and Concord, others picked up the urgent message and galloped off in all directions. Responding to their message, hundreds of patriot minutemen picked up their muskets and hastened to Lexington to make it hot for the British as they retreated to Boston.

Paul Revere was the one made famous by a Longfellow poem (“Billy Dawes got on his hoss…” doesn’t have quite the right ring, I guess), but let us not forget the other heroes of that fateful night and following day. Some rode, some fought. One of them, Wentworth Cheswell went on to serve honorably in the war and then establish himself and his family as pillars of an early American community. You can read more about him and others in Profiles of Valor.

What Does The Bible Say…with Rick Boyer

What-Does-The-Bible-Say-CMGenesis 1:1:In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.

Most of us know that one. Yet I went twenty years of my life thinking it meant that God worked through evolution to make the world and man to live in it. I was a grown man before I heard a preacher make an issue of the creation vs. evolution question.

I just got back from a trip to the Creation Museum last week. I had heard a lot of Ken Ham’s teaching before, but I learned some new things and my faith was strengthened still more by the museum’s abundance of scientific evidence of young-earth creation.

If you want biblical evidence, you need look no farther than Romans 5:12: “Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned:”

In other words, there was no death before sin. Therefore the dinosaurs didn’t die before Adam sinned. The fossils are only a few thousand years old. The lie of evolution is just Satan’s trick to undermine our confidence in the Word of God.

What about theistic evolution? I guess that’s what I believed in as a kid. The Bible said that God created the earth in 6 days and then rested. School said that natural forces created the universe out of nothing, living matter out of nonliving matter and more complex species out of less complex species. I reconciled the contradiction by concluding that God must have used the evolutionary process and the “days” of Genesis were in fact long ages, referred to symbolically.

But of course that doesn’t account for the fact that there could be no death before sin. So, to deny Genesis 1 we also have to deny Romans 5. If we don’t trust God’s account of the beginning, we can’t trust His Word on anything else. Pity us if we doubt any of God’s truth.



Lawyer for the Defense – Saturday Stories

Saturday-Stories-Boston-MassacreNo doubt you’ve heard of the Boston Massacre. By the title given to the event, you might imagine a huge bloodbath with hundreds of bodies littering the streets. Actually, five colonists were killed.

The confrontation came about because a gang of colonists were harassing a small group of British soldiers on guard duty. The Redcoats were hated in Boston as in many parts of the colonies because they represented the tyrannical grip that King George held on them. Some British soldiers had committed serious offenses, so the red uniform was looked upon with malice. Read More…